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A mother and daughter pose in their home at JJ Colony in Bawana….



A mother and daughter pose in their home at JJ Colony in Bawana. Part of my on-going project on slum resettlements in Delhi.

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Foto8 Exhibition: Kristian Skeie – The Long Road

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29 August – 15 September 2012

The Long Road is a collaborative project between researcher and writer Clare Cook and photographer Kristian Skeie, whose images take us on the journey of the annual peace walk in Bosnia, a symbolic act of remembrance and dedication of the genocide of Srebrenica.

Find out more at the Foto8 Website here: 
http://www.foto8.com/new/on-display/host-exhibitions/1601-kristian-skeie-the-long-road

 

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Panos photographers speaking at the Frontline Club in London

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Two Panos photographers speaking at the Frontline Club in London

andrew mcconnell

©Andrew McConnell/ Panos Pictures

As urbanisation reshapes much of the world, refugees are increasingly moving to built-up areas, including large towns and cities. Working with the International Rescue Committee and the European Commission’s humanitarian aid and civil protection department ECHO in eight cities across four continents, Panos photographer Andrew McConnell has spent many months documenting the daily lives of urban refugees.

Through images, refugee testimonies and video, the resulting body of work presents a unique insight into the lives of urban refugees today and challenges commonly held stereotypes.

On Monday 24 September 2012, Andrew will present his work at the Frontline Club in an event moderated by Dr Sara Pantuliano, Head of the Humanitarian Policy Group at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI).

To book this event click HERE

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teun voeten

©Teun Voeten/ Panos Pictures

After three years focusing on the drug related violence destabilising Mexico, photographer and anthropologist Teun Voeten has just released his latest photobook Narco EstadoTeun photographed the drug violence capital, Ciudad Juarez, as well as other hot spots such as Culiacan and Michoacan.

On 4 October 2012, Teun will present his images and speak about the collaborative and anthropological approach he adopted for the book, using introductory essays by El Paso based anthropologist Howard Campbell as well as Culiacan based writer Javier Valdez Cardenas.

To book this event click HERE

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Photomonth Talks: Radical London in Focus

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Radical London in Focus

Photo: David Hoffman

 

As part of Photomonth 2012 three photographers who have each documented different aspects of ‘Radical London’ give talks about their practice and show images of their work. Plus explore the radical history of the streets of East London in our walking tour.

 There will be an exhibition of the work of David Hoffman, Ed Thompson and Jenny Matthews at Bishopsgate Institute from 1 October – 30 November 2012.

 

David Hoffman: Policing Protest

Saturday 6 October, 2.30pm

David Hoffman has specialised in social issues photography for more than 30 years. Resolutely independent, much of his work centres on the increasingly visible control the state exerts over our lives and choices. Racial and social conflict, policing, homelessness, drugs, poverty, social exclusion and environmental protection are documented, often through coverage of protest.

David Hoffman is a board member of the British Photographic Council, a founding member of Editorial Photographers UK, Photo-Forum London and the campaigning group ‘I’m A Photographer Not A Terrorist.’

Tickets: £6, concs £4

 

Ed Thompson: Occupy London

Saturday 3 November, 2.30pm

On 15 October 2011 Ed Thompson went to photograph a group trying to occupy the London Stock Exchange in Central London. When the protesters were surrounded by police in an attempt to contain them (kettling), they set up tents and built a city. Ed continued to photograph the Occupy London movement for another five months and created an independent self-published book containing photographs and essays from various occupiers to create an intimate and historical account of Occupy London from the inside.

Tickets: £6, concs £4

 

Jenny Matthews: From Reclaim the Night to Slutwalk – 30 years of Feminist Activism in London

Saturday 10 November, 2.30pm

Jenny Matthews became a photographer in the early 80s seeing this as a means of being an activist, of documenting social issues and becoming part of campaigns to change society for the better. She was part of Camerawork, a photographic collective based in the East End of London, which promoted documentary photography. Her own practice became part of a women’s photo agency, Format. As feminists they felt it important to document women’s lives and their struggles. In this talk Jenny will take the audience on a visual stroll around London through our recent history looking at the issues and their representation.

 Tickets: £6, concs £4

 

This series is organised in partnership with Photomonth East London International Photography Festival www.photomonth.org

Booking is at www.bishopsgate.org.uk or on 020 7392 9200.

Venue: Bishopsgate Institute, 230 Bishopsgate, London, EC2M 4QH

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Noor Images: The New Brazil – group project

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The NOOR Foundation is presents NOOR’s new group project: The New Brazil.Following the multi-year climate change project, which has been seen by millions in international print and online publications, exhibitions, street posters, projections, conferences, public art installations and social media, we now looked at Brazil, a country in fast transition.

See it here: http://noorimages.com/project/brazil-by-noor/

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BJP: Fernando Moleres’ struggle to help juvenile prisoners in Sierra Leone

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Freetown. Checkers is a popular game in p

rison, with inmates sometimes gambling, often ending up in arguments and fights. Image © Fernando Moleres / Panos / laif.

For the past two years, Spanish photographer Fernando Moleres has been helping juvenile detainees in some of the most violent prisons of Sierra Leone. He speaks to BJP about the authorities’ inactions and how he’s trying to make a difference.

Author: Olivier Laurent

“Thousands of children in Africa have been abandoned and are living in prison, with adults, in conditions so extreme that their survival is at stake. Overcrowding, violence, sexual harassment, promiscuity, malnutrition, poor hygiene, infectious diseases, and lack of medical care are all common,” says Spanish photographer Fernando Moleres about his project Juveniles behind Bars in Africa. “Most African countries have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1990) which has strict regulations on the detention of juveniles.”

His exhibition is on show at Visa Pour l’Image, and he speaks to BJP about how he’s been fighting to help these kids escape the violent conditions that are plaguing Sierra Leone’s prisons.

BJP: What pushed you to cover this particular issue?

Fernando Moleres: My project started at Visa Pour l’Image a few years ago when I saw Lizzie Sadin’s Juvenile Suffering exhibition at the Couvent des Minimes [Sadin's work was on show in 2007]. Part of her exhibition was made up of photos from Africa, and this particular part surprised and touched me. That’s when I decided to work on this theme.

BJP: But why Africa over other continents and countries?

Fernando Moleres: First, it was because you have more chances of dying in these prisons than anywhere else – you can die of diseases, malnutrition. Also, injustice is more flagrant than anywhere else. There are barely any lawyers, some detainees have spent years in prison without even going in front of a court. There is a deep injustice – deeper than in any other country such as Russia, India, Israel or the United States.

BJP: How do you make the transition between the idea and the actual images? How do you get access, in essence?

Fernando Moleres: The entire process lasted two years in total. It all started with a Spanish bursary that allowed me to launch the project in the first place. I had one year to complete this work and I spent six months investigating the subject, trying to find the prisons that would allow me to work within their walls. I chose Sierra Leone.

BJP: When you describe, in the text accompanying your images, that you were the sole white man among 1300 black detainees, what impact has this had on your work? How did you come to be accepted within the prison?

Fernando Moleres: When I first arrived in that prison, there was a marked distance between myself and the detainees – except from a few men that wanted to see their stories told, who wanted to expose the conditions they lived in. I particularly remember one man, named Joseph, who spoke a little bit of English and became my guide. He had been accused of murder and had been in that prison for several years, so he knew the place quite well, who to speak to. These people helped me enter that world.

BJP: You also denounce the fact that NGOs aren’t helping these detainees. Is that really the case? Why not?

Fernando Moleres: I think the main reason is that NGOs prefer to work on projects that relate to young people and women – on health issues. It’s a lot more difficult for them to pay attention to people caught in the prison system. It’s difficult to find support from the public for a widespread campaign. For many people, when they see someone in prison, they think that person deserves to be there – because they did something bad, we think about violence, drugs, etc. It’s easier to get public support to help starving kids or pregnant women. But, people don’t realise the extent of the injustice present in these prisons. They are forgotten by everyone. When I was asking for help to NGOs – the Red Cross, Médecins du Monde, etc. – no one, absolutely no one wanted to help me. Of course, I was there on my own initiative; so I didn’t have a project they could study, send to Europe for the green light, which would then be rescinded… There’s so much bureaucracy that in these cases it would just not be possible.

moleres-sierraleone-044

Pademba Central Prison, Freetown. Bathing in rainwater. The wet season is the best time as inmates can wash. Water is a real problem in prisons in Sierra Leone: there is no running water and sometimes no drinking water, unless prisoners pay for it (1000 leones or 25 US cents a bucket). Image © Fernando Moleres / Panos / laif.

BJP: I understand that, beyond taking photos in these prisons, you are helping these young people. Why are you doing that?

Fernando Moleres: What’s going on there really is dramatic. I had to help them. How? I can bring some medicine inside the prisons [Moleres would take pictures of the detainees' conditions to show to pharmacists and doctors outside the prison and get the right treatments]. It’s very simple for me – I put them in my bag and get them in easily. What I do as well, is create a link between the detainees and their families. I can find them and call them. What you need to know is that a lot of families are not aware that their kids are in prison. Now, I’d like to help them differently. I’d like to do more than getting them out of the prisons. I’d like to prevent them seeing the walls of a jail in the first place. I can do that by being there during their first trial and by paying for their bail.

BJP: How do you manage this work, in addition to your full-time job as a photographer?

Fernando Moleres: I’m actually not the one that is actually going to court to help these kids. I pay a salary a person I’ve worked with in the past. This person is tasked with going to court, find guarantors for these kids and pay their bail. I’m also looking to develop other aspects – for example, where should we house orphans. This person receives $300 a month, which I pay from my own funds. Right now, I have enough money for three to four months, but I’d like to go beyond that, and that’s why I’ve started this campaign to raise funds.

BJP: What exactly are you trying to do?

Fernando Moleres: Right now, I’m just appealing for people to give money. I’m also trying to build a network of lawyers and other people that can help us locally.

BJP: Would you like to expand your activities beyond Sierra Leone – maybe across other countries in Africa?

Fernando Moleres: No. Simply because, right now, I’m the only one paying for all of this. I’m spending my own money. This exhibition, which is travelling around Spain at the moment, has received an award from the NGO Medecins du Monde. During the award ceremony, I asked them if they could help me finance this project. Their answer was no.

BJP: How do local authorities, including prison guards, react to your work?

Fernando Moleres: In Sierra Leone, the authorities are trying to change the perception that poor people don’t have access to the same justice system as richer ones. This sense of injustice has, in the past, led to a war. The government thought that the easiest way to prevent a war was to improve conditions within prisons or to change the perception of justice. The University of Oxford has launched a study to find out what should be changed to help these detainees. They found out that Sierra Leone was plagued with corruption – for example, a prison guard only earns $30 a month, which is barely enough to buy three lunches in a bar. So, of course, these men try to find other revenues. As a result, while there is a will to beat corruption, in reality it’s a lot harder to achieve.

BJP: What about the media? Have they helped in getting your message out?

Fernando Moleres: My goal was to get this work published in newspapers and magazines, and, indeed, I’ve been successful in getting the story out there. It’s been published 12 times in Europe already – three times in France, twice in the UK and in Spain, etc. I think this project is easy to publish, because it’s focussed on one country – Sierra Leone. What I’d like now, is to get another circle of people to react to this work. I’d like to see people exercise pressure on Sierra Leone to change these conditions. I think it would be easy for an organisation to force Sierra Leone to do something. The United Nations, for example, would be the perfect organisation to do so. Talking about the United Nations, when I was in Sierra Leone, a representative from the organisation came to the prison to visit the detainees. I went with him. He talked with a few dealers, the guards, etc. But when other detainees came to see him to denounce the injustice of the entire system, his answer was: “I’m not here to solve your personal problems.” This man, whose name is Antonio Maria Costa [his official title is Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Director-General of the United Nations Office in Vienna], has access to the country’s vice president and home affairs minister. He could have done something about it, but he chose not to

Read more: http://www.bjp-online.com/british-journal-of-photography/q-and-a/2106122/visa-pour-limage-fernando-moleres-struggle-help-juvenile-prisoners-sierra-leone#ixzz1s1dmS4lc

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Firefly Photofilms: Easter Special

Paul Jeffers:

Our Lady of Ta Pinu

 

Mark Esplin and Biel Calderon:

Crucifixion in Philippines

 

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Must See – Jason Howe

Jason P. Howe
Hello everyone, I hope this message finds you well. Not sure how many of you saw my recent posting but I finally managed to get the pictures of the IED blast in which the soldier next to me lost both legs last November published after 5 months of discussions and fighting hard against the MOD who did not want them out there.
I am assured that they are the first photographs of a British soldier wounded and still on the battlefield to be published for nearly 30 years, since the Falklands War. The MOD never did fully approve or fully release the images but I published them with the wounded soldiers full consent and approval.
Would like as many folks as possible to see this reality and little bit of history since it is after all why we as photographers continue to go out there, pls share if you feel appropriate.
Many thanks, Jason.

http://www.youtube.com/embed/TBK0tRq2bQU

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HUMANS: Nkasi Dudumashe

We love people. And their stories. This is why there is HUMANS, a visual exploration of the human condition. Ten simple questions about life, love, dreams and realities, shaped into shortfilms about the life and living conditions of the people portraited.

Meet Nkasi. We met Nkasi in the Kayelitsha township outside of Capetown. We hope that this will give you a first good impression of how she approaches life. A powerful and warm-hearted woman, that does a perfect start for our series of people from all over Africa.

For more info visit: http://www.humansproject.com/category/humans/

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Reconstruction Stories by Heber Vega

A devastating 8.8 magnitude earthquake and a resulting tsunami struck Chile in 2010. Because of this, a group of friends traveled to iLoca, a fishing town, which was the epicenter of this major catastrophe.

They went with the idea of helping the locals. That simple initiative has become a major project of both reconstruction and hope for the people in iLoca.

This production was recorded a year after the tragedy.

“This initiative has provided and built more than 30 houses while dozens others have been repaired and made ready for the cold winter.
The houses built by this initiative are bigger and better than any emergency house given by the chilean government to this date.
This group has created an NGO to continue to help the people affected by this earthquake.”

For more info visit: http://www.hebervega.com/